Having Chest Symptoms? Get Help ASAP!


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If you are not sure that you are having a heart attack and you need to know more, try answering these questions:

1. Are you having discomfort in the middle of your chest?

2. Are you having any of the following chest discomfort symptoms: Fullness within the chest, burning within the chest, aching within the chest, tightness within the chest or similar type symptom?

3. Do these chest discomfort symptoms come and go?

4. Are these chest discomfort symptoms worse with activity and disappear when you rest?

5. Are you reluctant to tell someone of these symptoms?

6. Are you reluctant to call because you think your mild symptoms do not warrant doing so?

7. Do you have any of these other associated symptoms: Discomfort that goes from the chest to your left arm or to your jaw, clammy perspiration, shortness of breath, nausea or dizziness?

8. If you carry with you nitroglycerin, does the nitroglycerin seem to take away the discomfort within 5 minutes?

If you answered yes to most of these questions you owe it to yourself to get these symptoms checked out immediately at the nearest hospital's Emergency Room or Chest Pain Center. It is better to be safe than sorry.

 

























Dr. Raymond Bahr's Articles & Videos

Dr. Raymond Bahr writes articles about the EHAC movement. He has also done several videos that outline the importance of Early Heart Attack Care.




Meet the Deputy Heart Attack Founder

Dr. Raymond Bahr

Dr. Raymond Bahr is passionate about cardiac care and preventive education. As the founding father of the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care (now ACC Accreditation Services), his passion to disseminate lifesaving information is a driving force behind the Deputy Heart Attack Program. Throughout his career, he has created multiple programs to help others understand the life saving measures that can save a life. In 1981 at St. Agnes Hospital, Dr. Bahr established the Chest Pain Emergency Department (CPED), the first such unit in the world. The initial purpose of this CPED was prompt and effective treatment of patients presenting with heart attack/sudden death. The CPED was coupled with an aggressive education program that taught the community the early warning signs of a heart attack. This education program extended to middle and high school students via health and science curricula.